Dec 1, 2019 - Qays "Majnun" bin al-Mulawwah (645-688 CE) and Laila bint Sa’d al-Amiriya (641-688 CE) “I pass by these walls, the walls of Layla And kiss this wall and that wall. Years later, as a student of literature, I read the Persian romance of Laili and Majnun by Nezami Ganjawi (1140-1209 CE) and then came across several reworkings of this amazing romance. Layla Majnun 1h 58m Romantic Dramas While in Azerbaijan, Layla, an Indonesian scholar, falls for Samir, an admirer of her work — but her arranged marriage stands in the way. Qays becomes obsessed with her, and the community gives him the epithet Majnun. It is a popular poem praising their love story. © 2021 University Musical Society. Towards the end of the story, when Layla, through the inter-mediation of a young, faithful devotee of Majnun, appears to him, he still refuses to have physical (or sexual) contact with her. While a Sufi (mystical) reading of it is plausible, one can justifiably read it as a conventional, yet immensely rich and enthralling, love-story. To compare, the story’s theme matches with Western ideals, proving once again that our world is more similar than one may believe. All rights reserved. Concerned about their daughter’s reputation as well as the honor and standing of the tribe, her parents ensure that the lovers are kept apart. Colors and architectural patterns in these artworks refer to these beliefs that invites man to self-awareness. Later in the story, the son becomes educated, becoming wise and knowledgable. R. Gelpke. In the beginning of the passage the author sets the scene of a sayyid who is very wealthy. The romance of Layla and Majnun has also been made into several popular films and movies in Hindi, Turkish, Arabic, and Persian. Layla and Majnun may be the most exotic and obscure score that Morris (who’s renowned for his eclectic musical taste) has ever set a dance to. There, Majnun pleads to Allah to make him “a hundred-fold” more “possessed” in his love for Layla. Layla and Majnun in the wilderness with animals, from a Khamsa (Quintet) of Amir Khusrau Dihlavi (Indian, 1253–1325), about 1590–1600. Laila called him aloud, ‘Majnun!’ He answered, ‘Laila!’ She said, ‘I am here as I promised, O Majnun.’ He answered, ‘I am Laila.’ She said, ‘Majnun, come to your senses. He speaks his love poems to the wind; others hear them and he attains fame as a poet. The sayyid later has a son who he values highly. In the story of Layla and Majnun, the theme of religion is also evident. But he became so obsessed by Layla that locals dubbed him Majnun, meaning madman. Accordingly, his excessive devotion to Layla represents his unique and steadfast devotion to Ideal Love, the Divine—which explains why, in spite of his incessant yearning for his beloved Layla, he is incapable of physical intimacy with her. THE STORY OF LAYLA AND MAJNUN. After reading Layla and Majnun I noticed some similar themes that were familiar to me. In allegory, Majnun symbolizes the Human Spirit longing for the Beloved or Layla as Divine Beauty. A recurring theme in our attempts as … It's only poor Majnun who suffers, and whose suffering brings redemption for others. "Layla and Majnun" by Nizami Ganjavi (1192). Although Layla, too, is truly smitten by love, it is Qays who publicly and unreservedly pronounces his obsessive passion in elegiac lyrics, thus earning the epithet Majnun (literally, “possessed” or “mad”). Personally, I look to my elders for guidance since they have already surpassed the stages of life that I am living in now. Majnun strives to realize “perfect love” in Layla, a love that transcends sensual contact with the beloved, a love that is free from selfish intentions, lust, and earthly desires. Nezami’s unparalleled narrative proved considerably influential during the subsequent centuries. In brief, Qays ibn al-Mulawwah of the Banu ‘Amir tribe falls in love with his classmate Layla bint Sa‘d. Colors and architectural patterns in these artworks refer to these beliefs that invites man to self-awareness. The National Library of Israel is in possession of five different versions of Nizami’s work. Layla and Majnun is a love story between Qais ibn Al-Mulawah and Layla that took place in the 12th century. The story of Layla and Majnun is more unique since it is full of rich descriptions and the play of Romeo and Juliet offers more dialogue but less description. "The Layla-Majnun theme passed from Arabic to Persian, Turkish, and Indian languages", most famously through the narrative poem composed in 584/1188 by the Persian poet Nizami Ganjavi, as the third part of his Khamsa. The story of Layla and Majnun is more unique since it is full of rich descriptions and the play of Romeo and Juliet offers more dialogue but less description. Ahmadi focuses on the musical history of Layla and Majnun, an Arabian love story which will come to life in Ann Arbor with a new production from Mark Morris Dance Group and The Silk Road Ensemble on October 13-15, 2017. This heightens the theme, proving money is no match for a valued relationship even in the Eastern world. Often thought of as an Arabian version of Romeo and Juliet, Layla and Majnun is a classical story of star-crossed lovers based on the true story of a young man called Qays ibn al-Mulawwah from the northern Arabian Peninsula during the Umayyad era in the 7th century. In brief, Qays ibn al-Mulawwah of the Banu ‘Amir tribe falls in love with his classmate Layla bint Sa‘d. "The Layla-Majnun theme passed from Arabic to Persian, Turkish, and Indian languages", most famously through the narrative poem composed in 584/1188 by the Persian poet Nizami Ganjavi, as the third part of his Khamsa. Beyond all of this wealth the the sayyid wanted one thing, a son. Lord Byron called it … He keeps praying to God that he gives him a son to be his heir. Wali Ahmadi is an associate professor of Persian literature at the University of California, Berkeley. Majnun’s incessant poetic expression of Layla’s beauty and his astonishingly … In Persian alone, one should mention Amir Khusraw Dehlawi’s masterpiece Majnun and Laili (completed c. 1299) and ‘Abd al-Rahman Jami’s Laili and Majnun (composed c. 1485). Layla and Qays, are in love from childhood but are not allowed to unite. His publications include Modern Persian Literature in Afghanistan: Anomalous Visions of History and Form (2008) and Converging Zones: Persian Literary Tradition and the Writing of History (2012). A common quote said in movies and everyday life is, “money can not buy happiness”. Images from the Heritage Museum. As a consequence, Layla was asked to marry Ward Ibn Salam and Juliet was ordered to marry Paris. Your email address will not be published. But for the Sufi, as for Majnun, it is the image of the Beloved within our heart that is our sole focus. The Sufi meaning of the Layla and Majnun tale is that love is the never ending quest to find God. possessed) is an epithet given to the semi-historical character Qays b. al-Molawwaḥ b. Nezami’s romance of Laili and Majnun is a multilayered, complex text, which makes 
it open to contrasting, and perhaps contradictory, readings. Majnun’s harsh life in the desert, then, has been compared to the ascetic life of Muslim mystics who rejected earthly pleasures and renounced worldly affinities. Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. In the Western world, the young respect elders as older people tend to have a better grasp on the world we live in. In Chapter XLI, beginning on page 132, Majnun writes an extremely detailed letter to Layla. He put his all into wooing Layla, and she reciprocated, falling in love with him. A young, romantic poet who comes to visit him … It's possible that Eric Clapton's song "Layla " was inspired by this legend. This creates a sense of great respect for people who obtain much wisdom. Layla was forced to marry another man and, although she did not love him because her heart still belonged to Majnun, she remained a faithful wife. مجنون ليلى كان قيس بن الملوح مجرد صبي عندما وقع بشدة بحب ليلى العامرية. The author compares the amount of gold and jewels to the amount of sand in the dessert. GHS208-01 Spring 2020 China and the Islamic Middle East, Philosophy and Religion – “Two Truth’s” Theory, Similarities between stoicism and Confucianism. Despite the abundance of mystical motifs and metaphors, the profane dimensions of the poem cannot be overlooked. As Majnun continues wandering aimlessly through the desert, bonding with wild beasts, living an ascetic life, and composing verses about his obsession with Layla, his father lures him into visiting the holiest of Muslim sites, the Ka‘ba, in the hope of curing him of his obsessive love.